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Poster: jory2 Date: Sep 12, 2011 5:56pm
Forum: web Subject: Re: Ethics and honesty - too much to ask for?

Why would you or anyone suggest that? This is not a "me" problem, many other people have asked the same question and deserve an honest straight up answer.

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Poster: OTRTim Date: Sep 12, 2011 6:02pm
Forum: web Subject: Re: Ethics and honesty - too much to ask for?

Well no offense,but so far you're the only person on here I've seen ask that. So I think what Jeff was trying to tell you is that you're starting up drama and that it's not appropriate to make drama public. Therefore send a private email to the email addy he gave you.

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Poster: jory2 Date: Sep 12, 2011 6:29pm
Forum: web Subject: Re: Ethics and honesty - too much to ask for?

In this web forum alone there are people asking the same question.
I did some background research on this as well, do some for yourself before making such a false statement.
It is (or was anyway) possible to see what the Archive looked like in 2001, 2002, 2003 ... take a look at the forums back then, same question, same no answer, same 'suggestion' to email infoATarchive.org
And for the record, what wasn't appropriate was making my content freely available on this website without my permission, and then assuring me (which was the only reason I didn't file charges) that my content was both removed and deleted.
Of all the websites on the internet one would think that the Internet Archive would at the very least be respectful and transparent.





This post was modified by jory2 on 2011-09-13 01:29:53

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Poster: copyrights.org Date: Nov 1, 2011 9:16pm
Forum: web Subject: Re: Ethics and honesty - too much to ask for?

The Internet archive makes the representation at their web site (http://www.archive.org/about/exclude.php) that "remove documents from the Wayback Machine" so they are representing that they delete the old data. I don't think they are actually following this policy or maybe it is some kind of evasive statement meant to trick people so that the data is removed from Wayback but saved somewhere else.

In any case the IA is not operating like a legitimate library.

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Poster: copyrights.org Date: Oct 28, 2011 9:13pm
Forum: web Subject: Re: Ethics and honesty - too much to ask for?

Hi, I have been asking the same questions, I asked these questionas about 10 years ago and again recently. All I received was incomplete, evasive, contradictory, and dishonest replies. The fact is that the Internet archive is not honoring their removal policy. Further, the policy is contradictory as far as the robots.txt file is concerned. The policy says the Internet archive is not to make the requests public yet a robots.txt file is public. I cannot get a direct answer to anything and they won't honor my requests. I want answers and I want them posted publicaly as well. I will be updating my article at http://copyrights.org as this matter progresses.

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Poster: copyrights.org Date: Oct 30, 2011 7:10pm
Forum: web Subject: Re: Ethics and honesty - too much to ask for?

I found this 1996 quote from Brester Kahle, the IA founder:

"Most institutions cannot touch this because it hits every privacy, copyright, and export controversy."
http://www.edge.org/documents/digerati/Kahle.html

The IA staff knows all about these issues and controversies. They keep trying to ignore all this stuff and act like they never heard of these issues before. That is nonsense.

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Poster: copyrights.org Date: Oct 30, 2011 4:10pm
Forum: web Subject: Re: Ethics and honesty - too much to ask for?

I have added this issue to http://copyrights.org. It is not credible that nobody ever asked this or was never considered. Further, it is shocking that a claimed Internet Archive and library would refuse to publicly disclose this policy. This is one more example of how the IA is operating like the private companies that are funding it and not a library.

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